manofarm:

Let the fava harvest begin. Finally, after being sown in early November and trellised and trained lovingly by Jan, the tall stalks are loaded with beans and ready to undergo their first big pick of the season. I have chosen to pick the pods at full size despite learning this year that they can be eaten smaller - pod and all. I tried this in the field one day and even though it tastes good, I’ll admit that it might take me awhile to come around on this one. The furry casing that houses the beans seems more like an article of clothing or a suitcase than a food to me personally. However if you prefer them in this premature stage, speak up and I can start providing the CSA with both sizes.
For those of you new to the springtime indicator that is the fava bean, don’t be alarmed. They do require a fair amount of time to prepare, as there are not one but two steps in the “shelling” process. The Huffington Post has a great video about processing the beans here, along with a number of nice recipe links. My personal favorite way to enjoy favas is by shelling and eating them raw whenever I walk past the patch – point being that they’ve got a great taste that can stand completely on their own. The easiest way to enjoy them cooked but with minimal processing is by throwing the whole pod on the grill until they darken, shelling out the individual beans once they’re cool enough to handle and popping their innards right into your mouth like you would edamame – thanks again to Jan for that nifty tip.
 In addition to the favas, a couple new items will start showing up in harvests over the next couple weeks such as radishes, Japanese turnips and hopefully our first couple handfuls of basil. We will also be getting a new flush of lettuce, spinach, cabbage, carrots and beets soon.
I have included watermelon radish thinnings in this week’s harvest both in the form of bunches of small roots as well as (optional) bunches of radish greens. We will eventually be getting into larger sizes, but the bed needed to be thinned out in order to size up and I just figured I may as well not waste perfectly good baby roots and edible leaves. These radishes are packing spice, but their leaves are still young enough to be enjoyed as you would arugula, mustard or turnip greens. See the radish green soup recipe below in this newsletter or on our web page.
After this pick, there are only two harvests left in the CSA’s Winter/Spring season. We will be taking a one-week spring break of sorts, so there will be no pick up on Friday, May 2nd. The CSA will commence its Spring/Summer season on Friday, May 9th. Please begin thinking about whether you’d like to continue on with Mano Farm CSA and let us know via email of your plans before April 25th.
Happy eats –
Shawn

Anyone wanna join our CSA this late spring? Email manofarm.
ZoomInfo
Camera
iPhone 4S
ISO
50
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/438th
Focal Length
4mm

manofarm:

Let the fava harvest begin. Finally, after being sown in early November and trellised and trained lovingly by Jan, the tall stalks are loaded with beans and ready to undergo their first big pick of the season. I have chosen to pick the pods at full size despite learning this year that they can be eaten smaller - pod and all. I tried this in the field one day and even though it tastes good, I’ll admit that it might take me awhile to come around on this one. The furry casing that houses the beans seems more like an article of clothing or a suitcase than a food to me personally. However if you prefer them in this premature stage, speak up and I can start providing the CSA with both sizes.

For those of you new to the springtime indicator that is the fava bean, don’t be alarmed. They do require a fair amount of time to prepare, as there are not one but two steps in the “shelling” process. The Huffington Post has a great video about processing the beans here, along with a number of nice recipe links. My personal favorite way to enjoy favas is by shelling and eating them raw whenever I walk past the patch – point being that they’ve got a great taste that can stand completely on their own. The easiest way to enjoy them cooked but with minimal processing is by throwing the whole pod on the grill until they darken, shelling out the individual beans once they’re cool enough to handle and popping their innards right into your mouth like you would edamame – thanks again to Jan for that nifty tip.

 In addition to the favas, a couple new items will start showing up in harvests over the next couple weeks such as radishes, Japanese turnips and hopefully our first couple handfuls of basil. We will also be getting a new flush of lettuce, spinach, cabbage, carrots and beets soon.

I have included watermelon radish thinnings in this week’s harvest both in the form of bunches of small roots as well as (optional) bunches of radish greens. We will eventually be getting into larger sizes, but the bed needed to be thinned out in order to size up and I just figured I may as well not waste perfectly good baby roots and edible leaves. These radishes are packing spice, but their leaves are still young enough to be enjoyed as you would arugula, mustard or turnip greens. See the radish green soup recipe below in this newsletter or on our web page.

After this pick, there are only two harvests left in the CSA’s Winter/Spring season. We will be taking a one-week spring break of sorts, so there will be no pick up on Friday, May 2nd. The CSA will commence its Spring/Summer season on Friday, May 9th. Please begin thinking about whether you’d like to continue on with Mano Farm CSA and let us know via email of your plans before April 25th.

Happy eats –

Shawn

Anyone wanna join our CSA this late spring? Email manofarm.

Source: manofarm

2014.04
285 plays

new in progress set for April. Lots of Mr. Little Jeans so far :)

Source: SoundCloud / jadecricket

6SoundCloud, jadecricket,

The latest from Shawn…
manofarm:

Spring is upon us! Two weeks ago I was talking eagerly about the new north field beds soon to be planted, and that day is finally upon us. Wiley and Steve’s combined tractor skills over the past week have given our new ground (formerly planted with pepper trees and boulders the size of small children) a thorough massage and the soil is now fluffy and full of potential. Basil, parsley, green onions, summer cucurbits and a calendula seed crop are definite tenants. I daresay tomatoes, peppers and eggplant are close behind. 
Soon to mature in the field: more carrots, red and sugar beets, spinach, fava beans, artichokes, radishes, dill, cilantro and Hakurei turnips. Red potatoes and sweet bulbing onions were planted last week along with one last crop of cabbages, broccoli and cauliflower before the summertime insect bloom. Remember to check out our Facebook and Tumblr pages if you’re looking for recipe ideas for your weekly bounty. We try to post a couple every week. 
Here’s to hitting the ground running! 
-Shawn
ZoomInfo
The latest from Shawn…
manofarm:

Spring is upon us! Two weeks ago I was talking eagerly about the new north field beds soon to be planted, and that day is finally upon us. Wiley and Steve’s combined tractor skills over the past week have given our new ground (formerly planted with pepper trees and boulders the size of small children) a thorough massage and the soil is now fluffy and full of potential. Basil, parsley, green onions, summer cucurbits and a calendula seed crop are definite tenants. I daresay tomatoes, peppers and eggplant are close behind. 
Soon to mature in the field: more carrots, red and sugar beets, spinach, fava beans, artichokes, radishes, dill, cilantro and Hakurei turnips. Red potatoes and sweet bulbing onions were planted last week along with one last crop of cabbages, broccoli and cauliflower before the summertime insect bloom. Remember to check out our Facebook and Tumblr pages if you’re looking for recipe ideas for your weekly bounty. We try to post a couple every week. 
Here’s to hitting the ground running! 
-Shawn
ZoomInfo
The latest from Shawn…
manofarm:

Spring is upon us! Two weeks ago I was talking eagerly about the new north field beds soon to be planted, and that day is finally upon us. Wiley and Steve’s combined tractor skills over the past week have given our new ground (formerly planted with pepper trees and boulders the size of small children) a thorough massage and the soil is now fluffy and full of potential. Basil, parsley, green onions, summer cucurbits and a calendula seed crop are definite tenants. I daresay tomatoes, peppers and eggplant are close behind. 
Soon to mature in the field: more carrots, red and sugar beets, spinach, fava beans, artichokes, radishes, dill, cilantro and Hakurei turnips. Red potatoes and sweet bulbing onions were planted last week along with one last crop of cabbages, broccoli and cauliflower before the summertime insect bloom. Remember to check out our Facebook and Tumblr pages if you’re looking for recipe ideas for your weekly bounty. We try to post a couple every week. 
Here’s to hitting the ground running! 
-Shawn
ZoomInfo

The latest from Shawn…

manofarm:

Spring is upon us! Two weeks ago I was talking eagerly about the new north field beds soon to be planted, and that day is finally upon us. Wiley and Steve’s combined tractor skills over the past week have given our new ground (formerly planted with pepper trees and boulders the size of small children) a thorough massage and the soil is now fluffy and full of potential. Basil, parsley, green onions, summer cucurbits and a calendula seed crop are definite tenants. I daresay tomatoes, peppers and eggplant are close behind. 

Soon to mature in the field: more carrots, red and sugar beets, spinach, fava beans, artichokes, radishes, dill, cilantro and Hakurei turnips. Red potatoes and sweet bulbing onions were planted last week along with one last crop of cabbages, broccoli and cauliflower before the summertime insect bloom. Remember to check out our Facebook and Tumblr pages if you’re looking for recipe ideas for your weekly bounty. We try to post a couple every week. 

Here’s to hitting the ground running! 

-Shawn

Source: manofarm

2014.03

fave new discoveries: daughter (“home”) and son lux (“easy”).

Source: SoundCloud / jadecricket

6SoundCloud, jadecricket, Ambient, House, Deep House, Downtempo,

plantgoodseed:

in our ongoing quest to strengthen both the diversity and beauty of our seed catalog we will release the following nine varieties throughout the spring: red express cabbage, thumbelina zinnia, california early wonder bell pepper, cherry belle radish, black cherry tomato, crookneck squash, galilee spinach, genovese basil, waltham butternut squash, daikon radish and vera english lavender. these classics have brought nourishment, dreams and reflectivity throughout years of our lives and we are proud to finally share them with you. 🌱 Visit our evolving spring collection at www.plantgoodseed.com. #plantgoodseed #spring2014 🌟🌺

Source: plantgoodseed

I’ve been learning more Photoshop techniques and been putting together some things as exercises to get better. Over the past two months I’ve been pretty rapt with what’s been happening – and is still happening – in Urkaine so it’s been on my mind. 

6ukraine, euromaidan, russia, sunflower, gun, justlearningasigo, kiev,

"I was not afraid, not one drop. There was just one idea in my head: ‘Run forward.’"

Dmitry Iliuk, 29, a classical violinist from western Ukraine.

Thursday morning found Mr. Iliuk crouching behind a plywood shield, preparing for a dramatic and risky offensive to reverse an effort by the police to press into the square two days earlier.

manofarm:

Greetings to you, 
This month is blowing right by. Our crop growth is starting to pick up speed with the increasing light hours, and where there was restraint when it came to harvesting, there is now eagerness to react to ripening crops in order to turnover beds for the oncoming spring plantings. Our carrots and beets grew from medium-sized to monstrous seemingly overnight. 
The flail mower was unleashed on our cover cropped beds, chopping away at luscious grasses and legumes and creating nutritious soil food. The renewed dirt is a little over a week away from being planted with awaiting red cabbages, sugar snap peas, onions, red potatoes, spinach and yes, more broccoli. 
The greenhouse is up and running, housing fast-growing flats of basil, tomatoes, eggplants, onions, calendula and cauliflower among other things, and so far seems to be holding strong despite the occasional nightly windstorms. 
It’s easy to get caught up in the race and view life as a series of small battles deserving our full attention, however I have been making an effort to step back and observe, when I can. We are so very lucky to be alive and healthy in the peaceful society that we dwell in. Appreciating what we have, even the simplest joys and allowances, is crucial. 
With gratitude,
Shawn

Shawn has been writing some really nice newsletters. Do give them a read of you have the time. manofarm
ZoomInfo
Camera
iPhone 4S
ISO
50
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/789th
Focal Length
4mm

manofarm:

Greetings to you, 

This month is blowing right by. Our crop growth is starting to pick up speed with the increasing light hours, and where there was restraint when it came to harvesting, there is now eagerness to react to ripening crops in order to turnover beds for the oncoming spring plantings. Our carrots and beets grew from medium-sized to monstrous seemingly overnight. 

The flail mower was unleashed on our cover cropped beds, chopping away at luscious grasses and legumes and creating nutritious soil food. The renewed dirt is a little over a week away from being planted with awaiting red cabbages, sugar snap peas, onions, red potatoes, spinach and yes, more broccoli. 

The greenhouse is up and running, housing fast-growing flats of basil, tomatoes, eggplants, onions, calendula and cauliflower among other things, and so far seems to be holding strong despite the occasional nightly windstorms. 

It’s easy to get caught up in the race and view life as a series of small battles deserving our full attention, however I have been making an effort to step back and observe, when I can. We are so very lucky to be alive and healthy in the peaceful society that we dwell in. Appreciating what we have, even the simplest joys and allowances, is crucial. 

With gratitude,

Shawn

Shawn has been writing some really nice newsletters. Do give them a read of you have the time. manofarm

Source: manofarm

agtoseeds:

Are you located in Southern California? Then bring the best of your seed collection to our hometown’s Seed and Plant Swap, going down next Saturday, February 22nd from 1-4 pm at the Chaparral Auditorium, located at 414 East Ojai Avenue in Ojai, CaliforniaBring seeds and plants to exchange if you’ve got them! We’ll be tabling with some giveaways and a few of our own varieties for sale. This event has a $5 suggested donation at the door and is co-sponsored by the Ojai Valley Green Coalition, Food for Thought, and the Center for Regenerative Agriculture. Contact David White at (805) 390-0747 or david@foodforthoughtojai.org for more information.

Source: agtoseeds

2014.01
67 plays

January playlist… keep lovin’ the ‘cloud.

Source: SoundCloud / jadecricket

6SoundCloud, jadecricket, Electronic,

No selfie / just a reflector
ZoomInfo
No selfie / just a reflector
ZoomInfo

No selfie / just a reflector

manofarm:

Happy Harvest Day!
During wintertime, the farmer’s job is to deliver fertility to fruit-bearing perennials and fruit trees. Perennials are plants that do not die off after one growing cycle but will instead persist for multiple years, such as the artichokes seen in this photo. This particular plant must have flowered late, as it still holds its aged, brittle flowers from last season up as an offering to the morning sky. Now, these plants are leafing out in full force in preparation for a March flowering. On Tuesday, they were weeded and dosed with essential nutrients for the year. They also received spanking new drip irrigation and a good long soak - a trip to the spa, really. Our fruit orchard is next, then the asparagus, then the raspberries. Since these plants and trees continue to yield for us year after year, the least we can do is keep the soil healthy and give them a good grooming now and then. 
Please enjoy this week’s spinach, cilantro, baby beets and purple mustard greens. Unfortunately, our mustard and bok choy will be in short supply unless we have another cold spell soon. The bagrada beetles have been persisting in this regular heat of late and seem perfectly capable of taking whatever they like - including kale seedlings. 
Until next week..
-Shawn

Shawn’s rockin out the tumblr…
ZoomInfo
Camera
iPhone 4S
ISO
50
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/241th
Focal Length
4mm

manofarm:

Happy Harvest Day!

During wintertime, the farmer’s job is to deliver fertility to fruit-bearing perennials and fruit trees. Perennials are plants that do not die off after one growing cycle but will instead persist for multiple years, such as the artichokes seen in this photo. This particular plant must have flowered late, as it still holds its aged, brittle flowers from last season up as an offering to the morning sky. Now, these plants are leafing out in full force in preparation for a March flowering. On Tuesday, they were weeded and dosed with essential nutrients for the year. They also received spanking new drip irrigation and a good long soak - a trip to the spa, really. Our fruit orchard is next, then the asparagus, then the raspberries. Since these plants and trees continue to yield for us year after year, the least we can do is keep the soil healthy and give them a good grooming now and then. 

Please enjoy this week’s spinach, cilantro, baby beets and purple mustard greens. Unfortunately, our mustard and bok choy will be in short supply unless we have another cold spell soon. The bagrada beetles have been persisting in this regular heat of late and seem perfectly capable of taking whatever they like - including kale seedlings. 

Until next week..

-Shawn

Shawn’s rockin out the tumblr…

Source: manofarm

So proud of my ‘lil bro.

umuima:

Menthol premieres at the Santa Barbara Film Festival on Feb 1st. We need asses in the seats, hopefully your asses.

Source: umuima

6menthol, movie, santa barbara, film festival, 2014, micah van hove,

manofarm:

Words from the Transplanted Farmer
Shawn here. I wish I could say that I am as nestled in at Mano Farm as the red cabbages and lettuce heads that we planted back in November. I know I will be soon - especially now that we’ve kicked off the CSA’s 2014 growing season - but transitions are hardly ever short and sweet. It’s been eerie taking a “winter” break from CSA picks during 85-degree weather. The last couple weeks have been marked with daily overhead watering somewhere on the farm, as our maturing leafy greens always rejoice in it, and I daresay I’ve altered my own walking routes for a midday dousing.
Aside from keeping the weeds at bay, we’ve been using this time to take down the circle garden fence and muse over how the space can be repurposed in ways that will make upkeep easier and production higher. Three fig trees that have made the journey with me from Sulphur Mountain will be joining the existing trees in the circle garden, and six pomegranate trees will be planted along the roadside. With the help of good friends and a trailer, I have also been able to relocate my small greenhouse on the land, and if the weather ever allows, I will be raising a small amount of seedlings inside - although in this heat it seems like it’d do more harm to young plants than good.
In a couple weeks, I will be turning under the small patches of rye and vetch cover crop that Quin planted in the fall in anticipation for late January planting. It is exciting to think about this process. I’ve always understood that it was the most efficient and healthy way to incorporate fertility into the soil - that is, turning live plant material under the soil and allowing it to break down, encouraging a thriving microbial population - but I’ve never been able to use this method because I did not have a tractor. In my earlier days of farming, I would cart expired plant debris to the perimeter of the garden, layer it into compost piles with animal manure, water and turn it repeatedly, then pile it back into the wheelbarrow and back out onto the beds many months later. This proved to be too physically taxing and time consuming to continue for the scale of food production that I was aspiring towards, so I eventually transitioned to incorporating fertility solely through the use of bagged amendments purchased off-farm. We will still be doing a fair amount of this, as most farmers must, but being equipped with the tools to effectively and systematically till-in green manure that we grow here on the farm is hugely beneficial and a vast improvement to my own prior farming methods.
I may have begun this, my first ever newsletter for Mano Farm with a complaint about the weather (really, what did you expect?), but I will conclude it with expressions of gratitude. I’m so very honored to have been invited to join the Mano Farm community, and have received nothing but encouragement and resounding support from everyone since my arrival in the fall. With the passing of each day, I am constantly reminded of why I took the chance I did by coming here - that is, to learn, to excel and to be nourished. Sometimes for growth to continue, we must first uproot ourselves. 
I’m beyond pleased that so many members from Mano Farm and Sulphur Mountain have chosen to continue receiving our delicious vegetables - your commitment to supporting our farming efforts is inspiring. Lastly, I’m feeling lucky all the time to be working alongside Quin, who has not yet tired of pushing me to succeed as the new farmer for Mano Farm’s CSA program.
Please enjoy this week’s assortment of leafy greens and citrus, and do peruse the handpicked selection of recipes that accompany this letter. As always, do not hesitate to contact me if you have trouble identifying any items in your weekly shares. 
Thank you for your support!

Shawn’s takin’ over…
ZoomInfo
Camera
iPhone 5c
ISO
Aperture
Exposure
Focal Length

manofarm:

Words from the Transplanted Farmer

Shawn here. I wish I could say that I am as nestled in at Mano Farm as the red cabbages and lettuce heads that we planted back in November. I know I will be soon - especially now that we’ve kicked off the CSA’s 2014 growing season - but transitions are hardly ever short and sweet. It’s been eerie taking a “winter” break from CSA picks during 85-degree weather. The last couple weeks have been marked with daily overhead watering somewhere on the farm, as our maturing leafy greens always rejoice in it, and I daresay I’ve altered my own walking routes for a midday dousing.

Aside from keeping the weeds at bay, we’ve been using this time to take down the circle garden fence and muse over how the space can be repurposed in ways that will make upkeep easier and production higher. Three fig trees that have made the journey with me from Sulphur Mountain will be joining the existing trees in the circle garden, and six pomegranate trees will be planted along the roadside. With the help of good friends and a trailer, I have also been able to relocate my small greenhouse on the land, and if the weather ever allows, I will be raising a small amount of seedlings inside - although in this heat it seems like it’d do more harm to young plants than good.

In a couple weeks, I will be turning under the small patches of rye and vetch cover crop that Quin planted in the fall in anticipation for late January planting. It is exciting to think about this process. I’ve always understood that it was the most efficient and healthy way to incorporate fertility into the soil - that is, turning live plant material under the soil and allowing it to break down, encouraging a thriving microbial population - but I’ve never been able to use this method because I did not have a tractor. In my earlier days of farming, I would cart expired plant debris to the perimeter of the garden, layer it into compost piles with animal manure, water and turn it repeatedly, then pile it back into the wheelbarrow and back out onto the beds many months later. This proved to be too physically taxing and time consuming to continue for the scale of food production that I was aspiring towards, so I eventually transitioned to incorporating fertility solely through the use of bagged amendments purchased off-farm. We will still be doing a fair amount of this, as most farmers must, but being equipped with the tools to effectively and systematically till-in green manure that we grow here on the farm is hugely beneficial and a vast improvement to my own prior farming methods.

I may have begun this, my first ever newsletter for Mano Farm with a complaint about the weather (really, what did you expect?), but I will conclude it with expressions of gratitude. I’m so very honored to have been invited to join the Mano Farm community, and have received nothing but encouragement and resounding support from everyone since my arrival in the fall. With the passing of each day, I am constantly reminded of why I took the chance I did by coming here - that is, to learn, to excel and to be nourished. Sometimes for growth to continue, we must first uproot ourselves. 

I’m beyond pleased that so many members from Mano Farm and Sulphur Mountain have chosen to continue receiving our delicious vegetables - your commitment to supporting our farming efforts is inspiring. Lastly, I’m feeling lucky all the time to be working alongside Quin, who has not yet tired of pushing me to succeed as the new farmer for Mano Farm’s CSA program.

Please enjoy this week’s assortment of leafy greens and citrus, and do peruse the handpicked selection of recipes that accompany this letter. As always, do not hesitate to contact me if you have trouble identifying any items in your weekly shares. 

Thank you for your support!

Shawn’s takin’ over…

Source: manofarm

agtoseeds:

A merry All Good Things Christmas! Those who are looking for last minute gifts can purchase gift cards through our web site. These gift cards can be shared electronically. Or, if you’re anywhere in Southern California, look up one of the 14 retail locations where our seeds can be found. Thanks for everyone who has supported us this year – it’s been real.

Source: agtoseeds

-