this star trek: the next generation episode – the last – is how we chose the name of our seed company. right now this phrase seems germane to what lies ahead. if I am cryptic on specifics it’s only because I do not entirely know what the future holds. autumn is here but summer still burns on. the time for reflectivity is well underway…

manofarm:

Hey Folks,
I know it’s been radio silent over here but I can’t be doling out winter squash (aka those saran-wrapped orange chunks more threatening than bricks found in today’s CSA harvest) without providing you all with some moral support. This is a new variety for our farm called “Lower Salmon River Winter Squash” that we are growing for seed. Prior to preparing it for you, we cut them open and scoop out the seeds. This allows us to both provide for the CSA while also yielding a new product for the seed catalog. We are also trying to avoid overwhelming you all by giving everyone their own 20-pound brick to lug home and gawk at. 
For those of you who are unfamiliar with winter squash, don’t be alarmed. The flavor of these babies falls somewhere in between butternut and acorn squash, and all you need to turn this into a delicious and hearty dish is a working oven, a sharp knife and some time. The easiest way to prepare winter squash is to first roast it in the oven on low heat with the skin on. After that, all you need to do is scoop it out of the skin and enjoy it directly or incorporate it into other dishes such as soups, raviolis, mashes or savory tarts. If you’ve got a real sharp knife and patience, you can skin it before you roast it but I find that to be very time consuming and frustrating especially with such thick skinned specimens as these. Here is an easy recipe for roasted winter squash:
Preheat oven to 300 F
If already seeded, chop winter squash into smaller wedges or chunks (skin on) and place into a large oven safe dish
Drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper and any herbs you prefer. I like to use thyme. 
Bake until tender, at least one hour but sometimes longer depending on the thickness of the chunks. 
Remove skin before eating
I find that if you spread winter squash preparation out over a day or two and fit it into your schedule as it makes sense, it becomes much less of a waiting game and therefore more satisfying once ready to eat. For example, I’ll bring home my chunks after work, chop them and stick them in the oven for an hour or two, making sure to shut the oven off before I head to bed. The next morning, I pull them out of the oven and put them in the fridge. The following evening when I’m preparing dinner, they are ready and willing to incorporate into your meal. 
Try pairing it with poblano chilis and onions (also found in today’s share) in a stir fry or if you’re feeling so fancy, a savory tart. Or throw some chopped carrots, leftover celery stalks, onions, chicken stock and parsley sprigs into the soup pot, cook them down, add the winter squash and puree with an immersion blender or food processor. Before serving, throw in some chopped beet greens to wilt down and you’ve got yourself a beautiful squash soup. 
Have fun, go nuts, it’s fall!
-Shawn

Shawn is back at it…
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

Hey Folks,
I know it’s been radio silent over here but I can’t be doling out winter squash (aka those saran-wrapped orange chunks more threatening than bricks found in today’s CSA harvest) without providing you all with some moral support. This is a new variety for our farm called “Lower Salmon River Winter Squash” that we are growing for seed. Prior to preparing it for you, we cut them open and scoop out the seeds. This allows us to both provide for the CSA while also yielding a new product for the seed catalog. We are also trying to avoid overwhelming you all by giving everyone their own 20-pound brick to lug home and gawk at. 
For those of you who are unfamiliar with winter squash, don’t be alarmed. The flavor of these babies falls somewhere in between butternut and acorn squash, and all you need to turn this into a delicious and hearty dish is a working oven, a sharp knife and some time. The easiest way to prepare winter squash is to first roast it in the oven on low heat with the skin on. After that, all you need to do is scoop it out of the skin and enjoy it directly or incorporate it into other dishes such as soups, raviolis, mashes or savory tarts. If you’ve got a real sharp knife and patience, you can skin it before you roast it but I find that to be very time consuming and frustrating especially with such thick skinned specimens as these. Here is an easy recipe for roasted winter squash:
Preheat oven to 300 F
If already seeded, chop winter squash into smaller wedges or chunks (skin on) and place into a large oven safe dish
Drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper and any herbs you prefer. I like to use thyme. 
Bake until tender, at least one hour but sometimes longer depending on the thickness of the chunks. 
Remove skin before eating
I find that if you spread winter squash preparation out over a day or two and fit it into your schedule as it makes sense, it becomes much less of a waiting game and therefore more satisfying once ready to eat. For example, I’ll bring home my chunks after work, chop them and stick them in the oven for an hour or two, making sure to shut the oven off before I head to bed. The next morning, I pull them out of the oven and put them in the fridge. The following evening when I’m preparing dinner, they are ready and willing to incorporate into your meal. 
Try pairing it with poblano chilis and onions (also found in today’s share) in a stir fry or if you’re feeling so fancy, a savory tart. Or throw some chopped carrots, leftover celery stalks, onions, chicken stock and parsley sprigs into the soup pot, cook them down, add the winter squash and puree with an immersion blender or food processor. Before serving, throw in some chopped beet greens to wilt down and you’ve got yourself a beautiful squash soup. 
Have fun, go nuts, it’s fall!
-Shawn

Shawn is back at it…
ZoomInfo

manofarm:

Hey Folks,

I know it’s been radio silent over here but I can’t be doling out winter squash (aka those saran-wrapped orange chunks more threatening than bricks found in today’s CSA harvest) without providing you all with some moral support. This is a new variety for our farm called “Lower Salmon River Winter Squash” that we are growing for seed. Prior to preparing it for you, we cut them open and scoop out the seeds. This allows us to both provide for the CSA while also yielding a new product for the seed catalog. We are also trying to avoid overwhelming you all by giving everyone their own 20-pound brick to lug home and gawk at. 

For those of you who are unfamiliar with winter squash, don’t be alarmed. The flavor of these babies falls somewhere in between butternut and acorn squash, and all you need to turn this into a delicious and hearty dish is a working oven, a sharp knife and some time. The easiest way to prepare winter squash is to first roast it in the oven on low heat with the skin on. After that, all you need to do is scoop it out of the skin and enjoy it directly or incorporate it into other dishes such as soups, raviolis, mashes or savory tarts. If you’ve got a real sharp knife and patience, you can skin it before you roast it but I find that to be very time consuming and frustrating especially with such thick skinned specimens as these. Here is an easy recipe for roasted winter squash:

  • Preheat oven to 300 F
  • If already seeded, chop winter squash into smaller wedges or chunks (skin on) and place into a large oven safe dish
  • Drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper and any herbs you prefer. I like to use thyme. 
  • Bake until tender, at least one hour but sometimes longer depending on the thickness of the chunks. 
  • Remove skin before eating

I find that if you spread winter squash preparation out over a day or two and fit it into your schedule as it makes sense, it becomes much less of a waiting game and therefore more satisfying once ready to eat. For example, I’ll bring home my chunks after work, chop them and stick them in the oven for an hour or two, making sure to shut the oven off before I head to bed. The next morning, I pull them out of the oven and put them in the fridge. The following evening when I’m preparing dinner, they are ready and willing to incorporate into your meal. 

Try pairing it with poblano chilis and onions (also found in today’s share) in a stir fry or if you’re feeling so fancy, a savory tart. Or throw some chopped carrots, leftover celery stalks, onions, chicken stock and parsley sprigs into the soup pot, cook them down, add the winter squash and puree with an immersion blender or food processor. Before serving, throw in some chopped beet greens to wilt down and you’ve got yourself a beautiful squash soup. 

Have fun, go nuts, it’s fall!

-Shawn

Shawn is back at it…

Source: manofarm

Clinging to warm things past heat:
A sun baked rock,
An illuminated screen
The light beyond dusk,
The lights I won’t shut off;
Uncountable flecks of dust coat the skin of everything.
Tomorrow comes tearing into today before it has worn away.
The truth
lies in its insistence;
the discomfort lies
in my resistance

Why do you put your self esteem in the hands of complete strangers?
-Helena Bonham Carter

(via 11039)

Source: helenabonboncarter

plantgoodseed:

We’ve made three updates to our Kickstarter campaign and will be posting another this week. Themes are: Community Supported Seeds & Explaining Our Packet Rewards, A Look at Our Seed Packet Production Process, and a Music Video for the Song “Water Tap” by Lizard Kisses shot on our farm.
ZoomInfo
plantgoodseed:

We’ve made three updates to our Kickstarter campaign and will be posting another this week. Themes are: Community Supported Seeds & Explaining Our Packet Rewards, A Look at Our Seed Packet Production Process, and a Music Video for the Song “Water Tap” by Lizard Kisses shot on our farm.
ZoomInfo
plantgoodseed:

We’ve made three updates to our Kickstarter campaign and will be posting another this week. Themes are: Community Supported Seeds & Explaining Our Packet Rewards, A Look at Our Seed Packet Production Process, and a Music Video for the Song “Water Tap” by Lizard Kisses shot on our farm.
ZoomInfo

plantgoodseed:

We’ve made three updates to our Kickstarter campaign and will be posting another this week. Themes are: Community Supported Seeds & Explaining Our Packet RewardsA Look at Our Seed Packet Production Process, and a Music Video for the Song “Water Tap” by Lizard Kisses shot on our farm.

Source: plantgoodseed

guardian:

Supermoon.
Credits on photos. 
ZoomInfo
guardian:

Supermoon.
Credits on photos. 
ZoomInfo
guardian:

Supermoon.
Credits on photos. 
ZoomInfo
guardian:

Supermoon.
Credits on photos. 
ZoomInfo
guardian:

Supermoon.
Credits on photos. 
ZoomInfo

guardian:

Supermoon.

Credits on photos. 

Source: theguardian.com

manofarm:

"Let things taste of what they are." - Alice Waters
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

"Let things taste of what they are." - Alice Waters
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

"Let things taste of what they are." - Alice Waters
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

"Let things taste of what they are." - Alice Waters
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

"Let things taste of what they are." - Alice Waters
ZoomInfo

manofarm:

"Let things taste of what they are." - Alice Waters

Source: manofarm

manofarm:

Well folks,
Nearly a month has elapsed since the blessed summer solstice and the universe is busy hurling fastballs of opportunity our way. At long last, Mano Farm and All Good Things Organic Seeds have been invited to participate in the Ojai Farmer’s Market starting this Sunday, so we have been hurriedly expediting our updated certified producer’s certificate and taking the necessary steps to prepare ourselves for this exciting and unexpected development. This is the first time that either Quin or I have held a booth at a farmer’s market so it goes without saying that this is a huge step for our farming endeavor. As for me, I am both honored and terrified.
Throughout much of my short farming career, my ability and preference to work independently has been my best friend and my worst enemy. I’ve always found working alone on the farm to be the most delightful and thrilling profession there is. On the other hand, my singular strength is limited and while it does improve with experience, I could always benefit from the help of more like-minded participants. Despite the fact that I spend most of my life growing things for a living and adjusting to changing circumstances in the natural world, I am unnerved by the idea of changing or growing my business, not to mention asking for help. Help costs the business owner time and money up front, and it’s been easy for me to overlook the long term benefits of creating the infrastructure needed to accept and incorporate help – until now. Opportunities for growth are presenting themselves and it’s time to react.
That being said, I have been fortunate with my supply of workers thus far. Every Friday, I’m joined by Michelle Dohrn and her daughter Phoebe who make harvest cleaning and preparation a breeze while delighting me with stories of the many different ways they’ve eaten our vegetables. And from just down the road, Jan Waterlow has been a regular participant on the farm for probably over two years now and provides consistent support and great company that I now find hard to get along without. We also just welcomed a lovely new intern from Canada named Allie who will be working with us for the duration of July and her presence has been hugely beneficial and refreshing. In the short time that she’s been with us, she’s tamed the thorniest raspberries, wrangled the most massive zucchinis and wielded hook and hoe ripping unsuspecting weeds from the soil with a smile on her face and Devendra Banhart in her ear buds.
And lastly, the help and encouragement that I receive daily from Quin is immeasurable. His love for Mano Farm has been unyielding since the beginning and working alongside him has shown me that there is definite strength in numbers when multiple minds are focused on achieving the same ultimate goal.
For this weekend, your homework is to eat tomatoes, zucchini, beans and onions and be merry. If you’re in the Ojai area, consider coming on out to the farmer’s market this Sunday where we’ll be selling our wares and collecting high fives in Steve’s old slot. We’d love your support.
With gratitude,

Shawn Fulbright
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

Well folks,
Nearly a month has elapsed since the blessed summer solstice and the universe is busy hurling fastballs of opportunity our way. At long last, Mano Farm and All Good Things Organic Seeds have been invited to participate in the Ojai Farmer’s Market starting this Sunday, so we have been hurriedly expediting our updated certified producer’s certificate and taking the necessary steps to prepare ourselves for this exciting and unexpected development. This is the first time that either Quin or I have held a booth at a farmer’s market so it goes without saying that this is a huge step for our farming endeavor. As for me, I am both honored and terrified.
Throughout much of my short farming career, my ability and preference to work independently has been my best friend and my worst enemy. I’ve always found working alone on the farm to be the most delightful and thrilling profession there is. On the other hand, my singular strength is limited and while it does improve with experience, I could always benefit from the help of more like-minded participants. Despite the fact that I spend most of my life growing things for a living and adjusting to changing circumstances in the natural world, I am unnerved by the idea of changing or growing my business, not to mention asking for help. Help costs the business owner time and money up front, and it’s been easy for me to overlook the long term benefits of creating the infrastructure needed to accept and incorporate help – until now. Opportunities for growth are presenting themselves and it’s time to react.
That being said, I have been fortunate with my supply of workers thus far. Every Friday, I’m joined by Michelle Dohrn and her daughter Phoebe who make harvest cleaning and preparation a breeze while delighting me with stories of the many different ways they’ve eaten our vegetables. And from just down the road, Jan Waterlow has been a regular participant on the farm for probably over two years now and provides consistent support and great company that I now find hard to get along without. We also just welcomed a lovely new intern from Canada named Allie who will be working with us for the duration of July and her presence has been hugely beneficial and refreshing. In the short time that she’s been with us, she’s tamed the thorniest raspberries, wrangled the most massive zucchinis and wielded hook and hoe ripping unsuspecting weeds from the soil with a smile on her face and Devendra Banhart in her ear buds.
And lastly, the help and encouragement that I receive daily from Quin is immeasurable. His love for Mano Farm has been unyielding since the beginning and working alongside him has shown me that there is definite strength in numbers when multiple minds are focused on achieving the same ultimate goal.
For this weekend, your homework is to eat tomatoes, zucchini, beans and onions and be merry. If you’re in the Ojai area, consider coming on out to the farmer’s market this Sunday where we’ll be selling our wares and collecting high fives in Steve’s old slot. We’d love your support.
With gratitude,

Shawn Fulbright
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

Well folks,
Nearly a month has elapsed since the blessed summer solstice and the universe is busy hurling fastballs of opportunity our way. At long last, Mano Farm and All Good Things Organic Seeds have been invited to participate in the Ojai Farmer’s Market starting this Sunday, so we have been hurriedly expediting our updated certified producer’s certificate and taking the necessary steps to prepare ourselves for this exciting and unexpected development. This is the first time that either Quin or I have held a booth at a farmer’s market so it goes without saying that this is a huge step for our farming endeavor. As for me, I am both honored and terrified.
Throughout much of my short farming career, my ability and preference to work independently has been my best friend and my worst enemy. I’ve always found working alone on the farm to be the most delightful and thrilling profession there is. On the other hand, my singular strength is limited and while it does improve with experience, I could always benefit from the help of more like-minded participants. Despite the fact that I spend most of my life growing things for a living and adjusting to changing circumstances in the natural world, I am unnerved by the idea of changing or growing my business, not to mention asking for help. Help costs the business owner time and money up front, and it’s been easy for me to overlook the long term benefits of creating the infrastructure needed to accept and incorporate help – until now. Opportunities for growth are presenting themselves and it’s time to react.
That being said, I have been fortunate with my supply of workers thus far. Every Friday, I’m joined by Michelle Dohrn and her daughter Phoebe who make harvest cleaning and preparation a breeze while delighting me with stories of the many different ways they’ve eaten our vegetables. And from just down the road, Jan Waterlow has been a regular participant on the farm for probably over two years now and provides consistent support and great company that I now find hard to get along without. We also just welcomed a lovely new intern from Canada named Allie who will be working with us for the duration of July and her presence has been hugely beneficial and refreshing. In the short time that she’s been with us, she’s tamed the thorniest raspberries, wrangled the most massive zucchinis and wielded hook and hoe ripping unsuspecting weeds from the soil with a smile on her face and Devendra Banhart in her ear buds.
And lastly, the help and encouragement that I receive daily from Quin is immeasurable. His love for Mano Farm has been unyielding since the beginning and working alongside him has shown me that there is definite strength in numbers when multiple minds are focused on achieving the same ultimate goal.
For this weekend, your homework is to eat tomatoes, zucchini, beans and onions and be merry. If you’re in the Ojai area, consider coming on out to the farmer’s market this Sunday where we’ll be selling our wares and collecting high fives in Steve’s old slot. We’d love your support.
With gratitude,

Shawn Fulbright
ZoomInfo

manofarm:

Well folks,

Nearly a month has elapsed since the blessed summer solstice and the universe is busy hurling fastballs of opportunity our way. At long last, Mano Farm and All Good Things Organic Seeds have been invited to participate in the Ojai Farmer’s Market starting this Sunday, so we have been hurriedly expediting our updated certified producer’s certificate and taking the necessary steps to prepare ourselves for this exciting and unexpected development. This is the first time that either Quin or I have held a booth at a farmer’s market so it goes without saying that this is a huge step for our farming endeavor. As for me, I am both honored and terrified.

Throughout much of my short farming career, my ability and preference to work independently has been my best friend and my worst enemy. I’ve always found working alone on the farm to be the most delightful and thrilling profession there is. On the other hand, my singular strength is limited and while it does improve with experience, I could always benefit from the help of more like-minded participants. Despite the fact that I spend most of my life growing things for a living and adjusting to changing circumstances in the natural world, I am unnerved by the idea of changing or growing my business, not to mention asking for help. Help costs the business owner time and money up front, and it’s been easy for me to overlook the long term benefits of creating the infrastructure needed to accept and incorporate help – until now. Opportunities for growth are presenting themselves and it’s time to react.

That being said, I have been fortunate with my supply of workers thus far. Every Friday, I’m joined by Michelle Dohrn and her daughter Phoebe who make harvest cleaning and preparation a breeze while delighting me with stories of the many different ways they’ve eaten our vegetables. And from just down the road, Jan Waterlow has been a regular participant on the farm for probably over two years now and provides consistent support and great company that I now find hard to get along without. We also just welcomed a lovely new intern from Canada named Allie who will be working with us for the duration of July and her presence has been hugely beneficial and refreshing. In the short time that she’s been with us, she’s tamed the thorniest raspberries, wrangled the most massive zucchinis and wielded hook and hoe ripping unsuspecting weeds from the soil with a smile on her face and Devendra Banhart in her ear buds.

And lastly, the help and encouragement that I receive daily from Quin is immeasurable. His love for Mano Farm has been unyielding since the beginning and working alongside him has shown me that there is definite strength in numbers when multiple minds are focused on achieving the same ultimate goal.

For this weekend, your homework is to eat tomatoes, zucchini, beans and onions and be merry. If you’re in the Ojai area, consider coming on out to the farmer’s market this Sunday where we’ll be selling our wares and collecting high fives in Steve’s old slot. We’d love your support.

With gratitude,

Shawn Fulbright

Source: manofarm

"The need for mystery is greater than the need for an answer."
manofarm:

Hello lovely vegetable eaters.

This is the time of year when the plants are on the move. The tomato vines are stretching out their arms and responding to guidance by growing new branches out of their armpits. The summer squash patch is a sandpaper jungle that requires bodily contortion and lots of hopping (which is more like leaping with my short legs) before plunging headfirst into the belly of the beast, only to resurface with too many squash to carry. Most of these plants have the favorable trait of an upright stature, but eventually they join the others in ambling across the pathway and into the cucumber patch next door where those vines are well into their own quiet chaos.  

The raspberry canes elongate and flower while continuing to send up vigorous shoots from below, and their wispy branches reach out to tug at your shirt as you walk by. The reign of the perky, tidy tufts of kale, broccoli and radish is over. There’s no “searching” for that Japanese turnip or Snowball cauliflower. Their leaves act like arrows, inviting your eye to follow them down or in and voila! There awaits thy fruit on a shiny platter. Nope, those days are long gone - summer is all about the vine. As a result, harvest is far more like a hunt.

Sure, sometimes you’ll run across zucchinis so gargantuan they’ll literally stop you in your tracks. Or the occasional berry or those first couple ripe cherry tomatoes will beckon for you, but it’s likely that they’ll vanish into a mouth (like mine) a couple days before the Friday harvest. The good stuff knows how to hide, and techniques must be developed to sniff them out on harvest days. Leaves act as shields and the best fruit can fall off the vine to rot, or grow to be the size of large infants if missed.

The tried and true method is the walk-by followed by circle-back every couple yards to see what you missed the first time. If this footpath were mapped out it would look a lot like a series of small curly-cues along the garden bed, and works especially well for raspberries and tomatoes. Then there’s the classic dance of digging through leaves, involving a breast-stroke type of swimming motion for the arms, which is better suited for the summer squash and cucumber.

The more angles you can see from, the better. For example, a child might find berries you missed due to their height perspective, so it’s wise to incorporate the squat in order to get the view from below when you’re picking alone. Let those kids eat all the berries they can get their hands on!

Does this theme transcend past the garden and into our social realities? When searching for answers, how many angles do you consider and how deep would you dig? How often do you revisit philosophical roads once traveled? Surely that answer is tied into how badly one craves the truth they’re seeking.

Here’s to the search!

-Shawn

Shawn’s writing = so good.
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

Hello lovely vegetable eaters.

This is the time of year when the plants are on the move. The tomato vines are stretching out their arms and responding to guidance by growing new branches out of their armpits. The summer squash patch is a sandpaper jungle that requires bodily contortion and lots of hopping (which is more like leaping with my short legs) before plunging headfirst into the belly of the beast, only to resurface with too many squash to carry. Most of these plants have the favorable trait of an upright stature, but eventually they join the others in ambling across the pathway and into the cucumber patch next door where those vines are well into their own quiet chaos.  

The raspberry canes elongate and flower while continuing to send up vigorous shoots from below, and their wispy branches reach out to tug at your shirt as you walk by. The reign of the perky, tidy tufts of kale, broccoli and radish is over. There’s no “searching” for that Japanese turnip or Snowball cauliflower. Their leaves act like arrows, inviting your eye to follow them down or in and voila! There awaits thy fruit on a shiny platter. Nope, those days are long gone - summer is all about the vine. As a result, harvest is far more like a hunt.

Sure, sometimes you’ll run across zucchinis so gargantuan they’ll literally stop you in your tracks. Or the occasional berry or those first couple ripe cherry tomatoes will beckon for you, but it’s likely that they’ll vanish into a mouth (like mine) a couple days before the Friday harvest. The good stuff knows how to hide, and techniques must be developed to sniff them out on harvest days. Leaves act as shields and the best fruit can fall off the vine to rot, or grow to be the size of large infants if missed.

The tried and true method is the walk-by followed by circle-back every couple yards to see what you missed the first time. If this footpath were mapped out it would look a lot like a series of small curly-cues along the garden bed, and works especially well for raspberries and tomatoes. Then there’s the classic dance of digging through leaves, involving a breast-stroke type of swimming motion for the arms, which is better suited for the summer squash and cucumber.

The more angles you can see from, the better. For example, a child might find berries you missed due to their height perspective, so it’s wise to incorporate the squat in order to get the view from below when you’re picking alone. Let those kids eat all the berries they can get their hands on!

Does this theme transcend past the garden and into our social realities? When searching for answers, how many angles do you consider and how deep would you dig? How often do you revisit philosophical roads once traveled? Surely that answer is tied into how badly one craves the truth they’re seeking.

Here’s to the search!

-Shawn

Shawn’s writing = so good.
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

Hello lovely vegetable eaters.

This is the time of year when the plants are on the move. The tomato vines are stretching out their arms and responding to guidance by growing new branches out of their armpits. The summer squash patch is a sandpaper jungle that requires bodily contortion and lots of hopping (which is more like leaping with my short legs) before plunging headfirst into the belly of the beast, only to resurface with too many squash to carry. Most of these plants have the favorable trait of an upright stature, but eventually they join the others in ambling across the pathway and into the cucumber patch next door where those vines are well into their own quiet chaos.  

The raspberry canes elongate and flower while continuing to send up vigorous shoots from below, and their wispy branches reach out to tug at your shirt as you walk by. The reign of the perky, tidy tufts of kale, broccoli and radish is over. There’s no “searching” for that Japanese turnip or Snowball cauliflower. Their leaves act like arrows, inviting your eye to follow them down or in and voila! There awaits thy fruit on a shiny platter. Nope, those days are long gone - summer is all about the vine. As a result, harvest is far more like a hunt.

Sure, sometimes you’ll run across zucchinis so gargantuan they’ll literally stop you in your tracks. Or the occasional berry or those first couple ripe cherry tomatoes will beckon for you, but it’s likely that they’ll vanish into a mouth (like mine) a couple days before the Friday harvest. The good stuff knows how to hide, and techniques must be developed to sniff them out on harvest days. Leaves act as shields and the best fruit can fall off the vine to rot, or grow to be the size of large infants if missed.

The tried and true method is the walk-by followed by circle-back every couple yards to see what you missed the first time. If this footpath were mapped out it would look a lot like a series of small curly-cues along the garden bed, and works especially well for raspberries and tomatoes. Then there’s the classic dance of digging through leaves, involving a breast-stroke type of swimming motion for the arms, which is better suited for the summer squash and cucumber.

The more angles you can see from, the better. For example, a child might find berries you missed due to their height perspective, so it’s wise to incorporate the squat in order to get the view from below when you’re picking alone. Let those kids eat all the berries they can get their hands on!

Does this theme transcend past the garden and into our social realities? When searching for answers, how many angles do you consider and how deep would you dig? How often do you revisit philosophical roads once traveled? Surely that answer is tied into how badly one craves the truth they’re seeking.

Here’s to the search!

-Shawn

Shawn’s writing = so good.
ZoomInfo

manofarm:

Hello lovely vegetable eaters.

This is the time of year when the plants are on the move. The tomato vines are stretching out their arms and responding to guidance by growing new branches out of their armpits. The summer squash patch is a sandpaper jungle that requires bodily contortion and lots of hopping (which is more like leaping with my short legs) before plunging headfirst into the belly of the beast, only to resurface with too many squash to carry. Most of these plants have the favorable trait of an upright stature, but eventually they join the others in ambling across the pathway and into the cucumber patch next door where those vines are well into their own quiet chaos. 

The raspberry canes elongate and flower while continuing to send up vigorous shoots from below, and their wispy branches reach out to tug at your shirt as you walk by. The reign of the perky, tidy tufts of kale, broccoli and radish is over. There’s no “searching” for that Japanese turnip or Snowball cauliflower. Their leaves act like arrows, inviting your eye to follow them down or in and voila! There awaits thy fruit on a shiny platter. Nope, those days are long gone - summer is all about the vine. As a result, harvest is far more like a hunt.

Sure, sometimes you’ll run across zucchinis so gargantuan they’ll literally stop you in your tracks. Or the occasional berry or those first couple ripe cherry tomatoes will beckon for you, but it’s likely that they’ll vanish into a mouth (like mine) a couple days before the Friday harvest. The good stuff knows how to hide, and techniques must be developed to sniff them out on harvest days. Leaves act as shields and the best fruit can fall off the vine to rot, or grow to be the size of large infants if missed.

The tried and true method is the walk-by followed by circle-back every couple yards to see what you missed the first time. If this footpath were mapped out it would look a lot like a series of small curly-cues along the garden bed, and works especially well for raspberries and tomatoes. Then there’s the classic dance of digging through leaves, involving a breast-stroke type of swimming motion for the arms, which is better suited for the summer squash and cucumber.

The more angles you can see from, the better. For example, a child might find berries you missed due to their height perspective, so it’s wise to incorporate the squat in order to get the view from below when you’re picking alone. Let those kids eat all the berries they can get their hands on!

Does this theme transcend past the garden and into our social realities? When searching for answers, how many angles do you consider and how deep would you dig? How often do you revisit philosophical roads once traveled? Surely that answer is tied into how badly one craves the truth they’re seeking.

Here’s to the search!

-Shawn

Shawn’s writing = so good.

Source: manofarm

manofarm:

Hey All,
This lingering pleasant weather has made this week’s harvest seasonally eclectic. I never thought I’d be able to offer cauliflower and summer squash in the same week! The variety characterizes the shifting of the seasons nicely, but is mainly the product of some good old-fashioned dumb luck. This is also an especially busy time for planting, so to have a nice window of mild weather to work with is delightful and pretty much as stress-free as it gets around here. The ability to tuck those tender greenhouse babies into the soil without as much worry of sun scorch or general heat stress risks turning this farmer soft.
On the other hand, Meiner’s Oaks Water District has resumed delivering hefty pass-through charges for water access from Casitas Water District, who will likely be our source of city water until the return of the rain. There is a lot of public conversation currently about how this drought will affect California’s farmers and alternately, how much of the state’s water supply farmers should really be allowed to use. This is too deep of a topic to hash out right here, right now - but it goes without saying that water is on my mind, same as it is everyone else’s.
Enjoy your eats –
Shawn 
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

Hey All,
This lingering pleasant weather has made this week’s harvest seasonally eclectic. I never thought I’d be able to offer cauliflower and summer squash in the same week! The variety characterizes the shifting of the seasons nicely, but is mainly the product of some good old-fashioned dumb luck. This is also an especially busy time for planting, so to have a nice window of mild weather to work with is delightful and pretty much as stress-free as it gets around here. The ability to tuck those tender greenhouse babies into the soil without as much worry of sun scorch or general heat stress risks turning this farmer soft.
On the other hand, Meiner’s Oaks Water District has resumed delivering hefty pass-through charges for water access from Casitas Water District, who will likely be our source of city water until the return of the rain. There is a lot of public conversation currently about how this drought will affect California’s farmers and alternately, how much of the state’s water supply farmers should really be allowed to use. This is too deep of a topic to hash out right here, right now - but it goes without saying that water is on my mind, same as it is everyone else’s.
Enjoy your eats –
Shawn 
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

Hey All,
This lingering pleasant weather has made this week’s harvest seasonally eclectic. I never thought I’d be able to offer cauliflower and summer squash in the same week! The variety characterizes the shifting of the seasons nicely, but is mainly the product of some good old-fashioned dumb luck. This is also an especially busy time for planting, so to have a nice window of mild weather to work with is delightful and pretty much as stress-free as it gets around here. The ability to tuck those tender greenhouse babies into the soil without as much worry of sun scorch or general heat stress risks turning this farmer soft.
On the other hand, Meiner’s Oaks Water District has resumed delivering hefty pass-through charges for water access from Casitas Water District, who will likely be our source of city water until the return of the rain. There is a lot of public conversation currently about how this drought will affect California’s farmers and alternately, how much of the state’s water supply farmers should really be allowed to use. This is too deep of a topic to hash out right here, right now - but it goes without saying that water is on my mind, same as it is everyone else’s.
Enjoy your eats –
Shawn 
ZoomInfo

manofarm:

Hey All,

This lingering pleasant weather has made this week’s harvest seasonally eclectic. I never thought I’d be able to offer cauliflower and summer squash in the same week! The variety characterizes the shifting of the seasons nicely, but is mainly the product of some good old-fashioned dumb luck. This is also an especially busy time for planting, so to have a nice window of mild weather to work with is delightful and pretty much as stress-free as it gets around here. The ability to tuck those tender greenhouse babies into the soil without as much worry of sun scorch or general heat stress risks turning this farmer soft.

On the other hand, Meiner’s Oaks Water District has resumed delivering hefty pass-through charges for water access from Casitas Water District, who will likely be our source of city water until the return of the rain. There is a lot of public conversation currently about how this drought will affect California’s farmers and alternately, how much of the state’s water supply farmers should really be allowed to use. This is too deep of a topic to hash out right here, right now - but it goes without saying that water is on my mind, same as it is everyone else’s.

Enjoy your eats –

Shawn 

Source: manofarm

manofarm:

Join our CSA - this was last Friday’s haul.

Source: manofarm

We’ve been working on a film project about the seed company. It’s not going to be a very long film and it will likely be used for a kickstarter campaign that I want to run. We shot footage over two days and have begun preliminary editing. This is probably the fifth or sixth time that my brother and I have worked on something in the context of the farm. This time feels different though because I have taken on so much more responsibility for what is happening with the business. There is a company that was created with two people but now only one is running it. And there is an ongoing need for a public face and my general desire to be behind the scenes as much as possible is a luxury that I don’t have.
ZoomInfo
We’ve been working on a film project about the seed company. It’s not going to be a very long film and it will likely be used for a kickstarter campaign that I want to run. We shot footage over two days and have begun preliminary editing. This is probably the fifth or sixth time that my brother and I have worked on something in the context of the farm. This time feels different though because I have taken on so much more responsibility for what is happening with the business. There is a company that was created with two people but now only one is running it. And there is an ongoing need for a public face and my general desire to be behind the scenes as much as possible is a luxury that I don’t have.
ZoomInfo

We’ve been working on a film project about the seed company. It’s not going to be a very long film and it will likely be used for a kickstarter campaign that I want to run. We shot footage over two days and have begun preliminary editing. This is probably the fifth or sixth time that my brother and I have worked on something in the context of the farm. This time feels different though because I have taken on so much more responsibility for what is happening with the business. There is a company that was created with two people but now only one is running it. And there is an ongoing need for a public face and my general desire to be behind the scenes as much as possible is a luxury that I don’t have.

manofarm:

Welcome back from spring break! Did you remember to pick up your vegetables today? Things have been pretty much business as usual here at the farm aside from taking a week off from the CSA pick. I left town for a long weekend of much needed relaxation and inactivity, and while I was away a robin made a nest in my greenhouse. 
It’s becoming obvious that we have arrived in a season of plenty here on the farm. The new beds that we formed at the northernmost edge of the farm are just loaded with fertility, as shown by our early basil bunches and spinach leaves so large that I could wear one as a hat. Our summer squash and tomato plants are all sizing up and strengthening despite the temperature fluctuations we’ve been experiencing of late. I hope that with next week’s heat wave we’ll start to see a lot more flowers forming in our summer crops. 
Beginning this season, I’ve employed the know how of CSA member and friend, Michelle Dohrn as our official Mano Farm food blogger. She will be continuing as a regular member in the CSA but will be posting to our website once or twice weekly about how she uses her bounty at home. Her posts will include weekly meal recipes with photos as well as the occasional tutorial about fermenting, pickling, making teas, drying herbs and other crafty methods for processing vegetables in the amounts and variety that our CSA offers, in real time. 
Starting next week, you can visit our website at http://manofarm.org to see her latest post, and you’ll also start receiving them in the farm’s newsletter every Friday. Definitely take advantage of this great opportunity to learn more about how to use your produce effectively. Our hope is that we’ll be able to compile the posts over time and create an archive that our CSA members (and others) can reference if they’re looking for new ideas or needing general CSA support or inspiration. 
Over the next month, we’ll start phasing out our winter and spring specialties such as the turnips, radishes, artichokes and broccoli, so enjoy them while you can! We can still hope for one last harvest of cabbage (green and red) and possibly some cauliflower.
Happy May, and be sure to do something especially nice for all your mothers this weekend.
With gratitude,
Shawn Fulbright
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

Welcome back from spring break! Did you remember to pick up your vegetables today? Things have been pretty much business as usual here at the farm aside from taking a week off from the CSA pick. I left town for a long weekend of much needed relaxation and inactivity, and while I was away a robin made a nest in my greenhouse. 
It’s becoming obvious that we have arrived in a season of plenty here on the farm. The new beds that we formed at the northernmost edge of the farm are just loaded with fertility, as shown by our early basil bunches and spinach leaves so large that I could wear one as a hat. Our summer squash and tomato plants are all sizing up and strengthening despite the temperature fluctuations we’ve been experiencing of late. I hope that with next week’s heat wave we’ll start to see a lot more flowers forming in our summer crops. 
Beginning this season, I’ve employed the know how of CSA member and friend, Michelle Dohrn as our official Mano Farm food blogger. She will be continuing as a regular member in the CSA but will be posting to our website once or twice weekly about how she uses her bounty at home. Her posts will include weekly meal recipes with photos as well as the occasional tutorial about fermenting, pickling, making teas, drying herbs and other crafty methods for processing vegetables in the amounts and variety that our CSA offers, in real time. 
Starting next week, you can visit our website at http://manofarm.org to see her latest post, and you’ll also start receiving them in the farm’s newsletter every Friday. Definitely take advantage of this great opportunity to learn more about how to use your produce effectively. Our hope is that we’ll be able to compile the posts over time and create an archive that our CSA members (and others) can reference if they’re looking for new ideas or needing general CSA support or inspiration. 
Over the next month, we’ll start phasing out our winter and spring specialties such as the turnips, radishes, artichokes and broccoli, so enjoy them while you can! We can still hope for one last harvest of cabbage (green and red) and possibly some cauliflower.
Happy May, and be sure to do something especially nice for all your mothers this weekend.
With gratitude,
Shawn Fulbright
ZoomInfo
manofarm:

Welcome back from spring break! Did you remember to pick up your vegetables today? Things have been pretty much business as usual here at the farm aside from taking a week off from the CSA pick. I left town for a long weekend of much needed relaxation and inactivity, and while I was away a robin made a nest in my greenhouse. 
It’s becoming obvious that we have arrived in a season of plenty here on the farm. The new beds that we formed at the northernmost edge of the farm are just loaded with fertility, as shown by our early basil bunches and spinach leaves so large that I could wear one as a hat. Our summer squash and tomato plants are all sizing up and strengthening despite the temperature fluctuations we’ve been experiencing of late. I hope that with next week’s heat wave we’ll start to see a lot more flowers forming in our summer crops. 
Beginning this season, I’ve employed the know how of CSA member and friend, Michelle Dohrn as our official Mano Farm food blogger. She will be continuing as a regular member in the CSA but will be posting to our website once or twice weekly about how she uses her bounty at home. Her posts will include weekly meal recipes with photos as well as the occasional tutorial about fermenting, pickling, making teas, drying herbs and other crafty methods for processing vegetables in the amounts and variety that our CSA offers, in real time. 
Starting next week, you can visit our website at http://manofarm.org to see her latest post, and you’ll also start receiving them in the farm’s newsletter every Friday. Definitely take advantage of this great opportunity to learn more about how to use your produce effectively. Our hope is that we’ll be able to compile the posts over time and create an archive that our CSA members (and others) can reference if they’re looking for new ideas or needing general CSA support or inspiration. 
Over the next month, we’ll start phasing out our winter and spring specialties such as the turnips, radishes, artichokes and broccoli, so enjoy them while you can! We can still hope for one last harvest of cabbage (green and red) and possibly some cauliflower.
Happy May, and be sure to do something especially nice for all your mothers this weekend.
With gratitude,
Shawn Fulbright
ZoomInfo

manofarm:

Welcome back from spring break! Did you remember to pick up your vegetables today? Things have been pretty much business as usual here at the farm aside from taking a week off from the CSA pick. I left town for a long weekend of much needed relaxation and inactivity, and while I was away a robin made a nest in my greenhouse. 

It’s becoming obvious that we have arrived in a season of plenty here on the farm. The new beds that we formed at the northernmost edge of the farm are just loaded with fertility, as shown by our early basil bunches and spinach leaves so large that I could wear one as a hat. Our summer squash and tomato plants are all sizing up and strengthening despite the temperature fluctuations we’ve been experiencing of late. I hope that with next week’s heat wave we’ll start to see a lot more flowers forming in our summer crops. 

Beginning this season, I’ve employed the know how of CSA member and friend, Michelle Dohrn as our official Mano Farm food blogger. She will be continuing as a regular member in the CSA but will be posting to our website once or twice weekly about how she uses her bounty at home. Her posts will include weekly meal recipes with photos as well as the occasional tutorial about fermenting, pickling, making teas, drying herbs and other crafty methods for processing vegetables in the amounts and variety that our CSA offers, in real time. 

Starting next week, you can visit our website at http://manofarm.org to see her latest post, and you’ll also start receiving them in the farm’s newsletter every Friday. Definitely take advantage of this great opportunity to learn more about how to use your produce effectively. Our hope is that we’ll be able to compile the posts over time and create an archive that our CSA members (and others) can reference if they’re looking for new ideas or needing general CSA support or inspiration. 

Over the next month, we’ll start phasing out our winter and spring specialties such as the turnips, radishes, artichokes and broccoli, so enjoy them while you can! We can still hope for one last harvest of cabbage (green and red) and possibly some cauliflower.

Happy May, and be sure to do something especially nice for all your mothers this weekend.

With gratitude,

Shawn Fulbright

Source: manofarm

manofarm:

Let the fava harvest begin. Finally, after being sown in early November and trellised and trained lovingly by Jan, the tall stalks are loaded with beans and ready to undergo their first big pick of the season. I have chosen to pick the pods at full size despite learning this year that they can be eaten smaller - pod and all. I tried this in the field one day and even though it tastes good, I’ll admit that it might take me awhile to come around on this one. The furry casing that houses the beans seems more like an article of clothing or a suitcase than a food to me personally. However if you prefer them in this premature stage, speak up and I can start providing the CSA with both sizes.
For those of you new to the springtime indicator that is the fava bean, don’t be alarmed. They do require a fair amount of time to prepare, as there are not one but two steps in the “shelling” process. The Huffington Post has a great video about processing the beans here, along with a number of nice recipe links. My personal favorite way to enjoy favas is by shelling and eating them raw whenever I walk past the patch – point being that they’ve got a great taste that can stand completely on their own. The easiest way to enjoy them cooked but with minimal processing is by throwing the whole pod on the grill until they darken, shelling out the individual beans once they’re cool enough to handle and popping their innards right into your mouth like you would edamame – thanks again to Jan for that nifty tip.
 In addition to the favas, a couple new items will start showing up in harvests over the next couple weeks such as radishes, Japanese turnips and hopefully our first couple handfuls of basil. We will also be getting a new flush of lettuce, spinach, cabbage, carrots and beets soon.
I have included watermelon radish thinnings in this week’s harvest both in the form of bunches of small roots as well as (optional) bunches of radish greens. We will eventually be getting into larger sizes, but the bed needed to be thinned out in order to size up and I just figured I may as well not waste perfectly good baby roots and edible leaves. These radishes are packing spice, but their leaves are still young enough to be enjoyed as you would arugula, mustard or turnip greens. See the radish green soup recipe below in this newsletter or on our web page.
After this pick, there are only two harvests left in the CSA’s Winter/Spring season. We will be taking a one-week spring break of sorts, so there will be no pick up on Friday, May 2nd. The CSA will commence its Spring/Summer season on Friday, May 9th. Please begin thinking about whether you’d like to continue on with Mano Farm CSA and let us know via email of your plans before April 25th.
Happy eats –
Shawn

Anyone wanna join our CSA this late spring? Email manofarm.
ZoomInfo
Camera
iPhone 4S
ISO
50
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/438th
Focal Length
4mm

manofarm:

Let the fava harvest begin. Finally, after being sown in early November and trellised and trained lovingly by Jan, the tall stalks are loaded with beans and ready to undergo their first big pick of the season. I have chosen to pick the pods at full size despite learning this year that they can be eaten smaller - pod and all. I tried this in the field one day and even though it tastes good, I’ll admit that it might take me awhile to come around on this one. The furry casing that houses the beans seems more like an article of clothing or a suitcase than a food to me personally. However if you prefer them in this premature stage, speak up and I can start providing the CSA with both sizes.

For those of you new to the springtime indicator that is the fava bean, don’t be alarmed. They do require a fair amount of time to prepare, as there are not one but two steps in the “shelling” process. The Huffington Post has a great video about processing the beans here, along with a number of nice recipe links. My personal favorite way to enjoy favas is by shelling and eating them raw whenever I walk past the patch – point being that they’ve got a great taste that can stand completely on their own. The easiest way to enjoy them cooked but with minimal processing is by throwing the whole pod on the grill until they darken, shelling out the individual beans once they’re cool enough to handle and popping their innards right into your mouth like you would edamame – thanks again to Jan for that nifty tip.

 In addition to the favas, a couple new items will start showing up in harvests over the next couple weeks such as radishes, Japanese turnips and hopefully our first couple handfuls of basil. We will also be getting a new flush of lettuce, spinach, cabbage, carrots and beets soon.

I have included watermelon radish thinnings in this week’s harvest both in the form of bunches of small roots as well as (optional) bunches of radish greens. We will eventually be getting into larger sizes, but the bed needed to be thinned out in order to size up and I just figured I may as well not waste perfectly good baby roots and edible leaves. These radishes are packing spice, but their leaves are still young enough to be enjoyed as you would arugula, mustard or turnip greens. See the radish green soup recipe below in this newsletter or on our web page.

After this pick, there are only two harvests left in the CSA’s Winter/Spring season. We will be taking a one-week spring break of sorts, so there will be no pick up on Friday, May 2nd. The CSA will commence its Spring/Summer season on Friday, May 9th. Please begin thinking about whether you’d like to continue on with Mano Farm CSA and let us know via email of your plans before April 25th.

Happy eats –

Shawn

Anyone wanna join our CSA this late spring? Email manofarm.

Source: manofarm

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